Saturday, May 22, 2010

I have shifted my writing about Alzheimer's disease, dementia, dementia caregiving, and my experience in caring for my Mother to this site. I hope you will join me there.


Saturday, January 31, 2009

Alzheimer's

Slipping Away
Slowly
Slowly
Suddenly Realizing
She's Gone

By Paula Farris
Copyright 2009, All Rights Reserved

Friday, January 30, 2009

Remembering Holidays

The last year that my Mom was alive we, of course, continued to celebrate all the holidays and birthdays that we usually celebrate. But Mom didn't remember.

We threw a Birthday Party for her in early July. Her birthday was the day before the fourth of July so we were in an extra festive mood.

We invited several family friends--people Mom used to be so excited to see. She didn't remember them.

She didn't remember that is was her birthday. She didn't remember.

But we celebrated anyway.

Saturday, January 17, 2009

Slow Down, You Move Too Fast

As I walked with my Mom from the car to her Dr. appointment (which, sadly, is the only place we ever seemed to go for far too long), I would start to walk at my normal hectic pace. Then I would remember that Mom couldn't keep up anymore.

I would be reminded of the old song, Feeling Groovy. There is a line that says, "Slow down, you movin' too fast; You gotta make the moment last . . ."

How I wish I had made more of those moments last. The moments when my Mom would take my son to the park and actually climb on the jungle gym with him. The moments when she borrow my children for the afternoon and make gingerbread houses or plan a surprise birthday party for me. The moments when she would labor for hours in the kitchen and then serve my family a delicious meal.

So many moments . . . So little time . . .

Treasure what you have when you have it. You will miss it when it is gone.

Saturday, December 13, 2008

About My Mom . . .

I started this blog as a way to cope with the emotions of being a caregiver for my Mom. It has been a long time since I last posted here.

Caring for an Alzheimer's patient is draining--physically and emotionally. It requires a lot of time. About the time of my last post here my Mom started to go downhill in her years long battle with Alzheimer's. She was also suffering from multiple blood clots.

I spent the spring and summer helping to take care of her along with my sister and step-dad. My mom was hospitalized in early September due to complications from the blood clots. She passed away on September 18th.

I debated whether or not to continue this blog. I am no longer a caregiver to an Alzheimer's patient and I do not want to mislead anyone. But I have decided to continue to post here because I have some experience dealing with dementia and I hope to be able to help someone through my words.

I would appreciate your comments on this blog. Let me know if my words have helped you or how I can help you.

I have also started a website on this subject Dementia Caregiving 101. I look forward to serving you.

Saturday, April 12, 2008

Caregiving

She cuddles with a stuffed bunny
And talks on the phone when no one is there
She eats her salad with her fingers
But I hope she knows I care

One minute angry
The next minute scared
She doesn't understand things
But I hope she knows I care

A smile, a hug
Then, "Who are you? Why are you there?"
I just do what is necessary
Because I know I care

Copyright 2008 Paula Farris

Saturday, April 5, 2008

Remember

"Do you remember that we are going to the Dr's office?"

"We are? Why?"

"To check on your broken toe, remember?"

"My toe sure does hurt. How did I hurt it?"

"You hurt it when you tripped, at the same time that you broke your nose."

"I broke my nose?"

"Yes, remember? The firemen came and you had to ride in an ambulance to the hospital."

"I didn't like the hospital. I couldn't remember why I was there."

"I know. That is why it is important that we take care of your toe, so that you don't end up back in the hospital. The Dr. will check it today."

"I'm going to see the Dr. today? Why?"

"Yes, remember . . ."

Sometimes I wish I could forget.